Aug 23
If you don’t compromise [your gift], if you write each day as well as you can, and then submit your work and not worry about it and go on to the next piece, you suddenly find oddly enough that you’re no more interested in the applause than the silence. You don’t hear either one of them. You can never listen to the naysayers. If you do you won’t survive.
James Lee Burke (via writingquotes)
Aug 21

asylum-art:

Echo Morgan: Blue and White Porcelain

photos: Jamie Baker

The performance “’Be the Inside of the Vase” was divided into two parts.
The first story began with my dad’s attempt to commit suicide. The performance revealed my uneasy childhood and difficult relationship with my father. I was still and silent whist my voice revealed the narrative using a pre-recorded audio. In the second performance the story moves towards my relationship with my mother. Through a rather brutal personal history I addressed sexually political statements:
From my father: “Women should be like vase, smooth, decorative and empty inside! ” From my mother: “ Don’t be a vase, pretty but empty inside, be the inside, be the quality!” From myself: “This is my voice, my story, my childhood, I am not a vase! .”

Watch the video:

Be the inside of the vase from Echo Morgan on Vimeo.

Aug 18

There’s an excerpt from my new novel, THE GETAWAY GOD, up on the Harper Voyager site. Be sure to hit the Fit Window or Full Screen button in the lower left or the pages are teeny tiny.

http://harpervoyagerbooks.com/2014/08/18/exclusive-excerpt-from-the-getaway-god-by-richard-kadrey/

Aug 17

http://kat-howard.tumblr.com/post/95021196595/fantasy-is-sometimes-dismissed-as-childish-or

kat-howard:

Fantasy is sometimes dismissed as childish, or escapist, but I take what I am doing very, very seriously. For me fantasy isn’t about escaping from reality, it’s about re-encountering the challenges of the real world, but externalized and transformed. It’s an emotionally raw genre — it forces you…

natasha romanoff + tumblr wanting a black widow movie.

Source: hillsmaria

John Waters ponders Dorothy’s choices in The Wizard of Oz.

John Waters ponders Dorothy’s choices in The Wizard of Oz.

Aug 16
Artist 3D-Prints City-Shaped Shells For Hermit Crabs  
"Japanese artist Aki Inomata has partnered with, of all things, hermit crabs, to create a brilliant architectural art project. Using a 3D printer, Inomata created clear plastic shells with cities on them that were then promptly inhabited by their new hermit crab residents…"
http://www.boredpanda.com/3d-printed-hermit-crab-shells-architecture-aki-inomata/

Artist 3D-Prints City-Shaped Shells For Hermit Crabs

"Japanese artist Aki Inomata has partnered with, of all things, hermit crabs, to create a brilliant architectural art project. Using a 3D printer, Inomata created clear plastic shells with cities on them that were then promptly inhabited by their new hermit crab residents…"

http://www.boredpanda.com/3d-printed-hermit-crab-shells-architecture-aki-inomata/

Aug 15
cinephiliabeyond:

“Originally I didn’t want to do it. I’ve enjoyed reading Chandler, though I never did finish The Long Goodbye, and I liked those 1940s movies, but I just didn’t want to play around with them. I was sent the script by the producers and at first I said, ‘I don’t want to do Raymond Chandler.’ If you say ‘Philip Marlowe,’ people just think of Humphrey Bogart. Robert Mitchum was being proposed for it. But I just didn’t want to do another Philip Marlowe film and have it wrap up the same way all the other films did. I think it was David Picker, the production chief at United Artists, who suggested Elliott Gould for Marlowe — and then I was interested.

She wrote that [The Big Sleep] like a man. She writes good. —Howard Hawks, quoted in Hawks on Hawks 

So I read Leigh Brackett's script — she wrote the script of The Big Sleep for Hawks — and in her version, in the last scene, Marlowe pulled out his gun and killed his best friend, Terry Lennox. It was so out of character for Marlowe, I said, ‘I’ll do the picture, but you cannot change that ending! It must be in the contract.’ They all agreed, which was very surprising. If she hadn’t written that ending, I guarantee I wouldn’t have done it. It said, ‘This is just a movie.’ After that, we had him do his funny little dance down the road and you hear ‘Hooray for Hollywood,’ and that’s what it’s really about — ‘Hooray for Hollywood.’ It even looked like a road made in a Hollywood studio. And with Eileen Wade driving past, it’s like the final scene in The Third Man.

I decided that we were going to call him Rip Van Marlowe, as if he’d been asleep for twenty years, had woken up and was wandering through this landscape of the early 1970s, but trying to invoke the morals of a previous era. I put him in that dark suit, white shirt and tie, while everyone else was smelling incense and smoking pot and going topless; everything was health food and exercise and cool. So we just satirized that whole time. And that’s why that line of Elliott’s — ‘It’s OK with me’ — became his key line throughout the film.” —Robert Altman
ALTMAN DESCRIBES HIS PARTICULAR WAY OF SHOOTING THE LONG GOODBYE:
“I decided that the camera should never stop moving. It was arbitrary. We would just put the camera on a dolly and everything would move or pan, but it didn’t match the action; usually it was counter to it. It gave me that feeling that when the audience see the film, they’re kind of a voyeur. You’re looking at something you shouldn’t be looking at. Not that what you’re seeing is off limits; just that you’re not supposed to be there. You had to see over someone’s shoulder or peer round someone’s back. I just think that in so many films everything’s so beautiful, the lighting is gorgeous and with each shot everything is relit. My method also means you don’t have to light for close-ups; you only have to accommodate what may happen, so you just light the scene and it saves a lot of time. The rougher it looked, the better it served my purpose.
I was worried about the harsh light of southern California and I wanted to give the film the soft, pastel look you see on old postcards from the 1940s. So we post-flashed the film even further than we did on McCabe & Mrs Miller, almost 100 percent.”

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Leigh Brackett’s screenplay for The Long Goodbye [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers. Absolutely our highest recommendation.

Originally broadcast on 17 July 1996 in Channel Four’s Cinefile series, Paul Joyce’s acclaimed documentary profile of Robert Altman, with contributions from Altman, Gould, Shelley Duvall, assistant director Alan Rudolph and screenwriter Joan Tewkesbury, spans his career from its earliest beginnings to Kansas City  (1996) and offer some interesting insight into the director’s career.

Film critic Tony Macklin visited Leigh Brackett “on a hot, humid, blazing July 1975 day” at her farmhouse in Kinsman, Ohio. “I vividly remember Leigh’s making us lemonade to help cool us — it was pure sugar.” See also: Leigh Brackett — Journeyman Plumber. Daniel Martin Eckhart discovered more about what must have been a very special friendship between Brackett and Hawks.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

“Originally I didn’t want to do it. I’ve enjoyed reading Chandler, though I never did finish The Long Goodbye, and I liked those 1940s movies, but I just didn’t want to play around with them. I was sent the script by the producers and at first I said, ‘I don’t want to do Raymond Chandler.’ If you say ‘Philip Marlowe,’ people just think of Humphrey Bogart. Robert Mitchum was being proposed for it. But I just didn’t want to do another Philip Marlowe film and have it wrap up the same way all the other films did. I think it was David Picker, the production chief at United Artists, who suggested Elliott Gould for Marlowe — and then I was interested.

She wrote that [The Big Sleep] like a man. She writes good.
Howard Hawks, quoted in Hawks on Hawks

So I read Leigh Brackett's script — she wrote the script of The Big Sleep for Hawks — and in her version, in the last scene, Marlowe pulled out his gun and killed his best friend, Terry Lennox. It was so out of character for Marlowe, I said, ‘I’ll do the picture, but you cannot change that ending! It must be in the contract.’ They all agreed, which was very surprising. If she hadn’t written that ending, I guarantee I wouldn’t have done it. It said, ‘This is just a movie.’ After that, we had him do his funny little dance down the road and you hear ‘Hooray for Hollywood,’ and that’s what it’s really about — ‘Hooray for Hollywood.’ It even looked like a road made in a Hollywood studio. And with Eileen Wade driving past, it’s like the final scene in The Third Man.

I decided that we were going to call him Rip Van Marlowe, as if he’d been asleep for twenty years, had woken up and was wandering through this landscape of the early 1970s, but trying to invoke the morals of a previous era. I put him in that dark suit, white shirt and tie, while everyone else was smelling incense and smoking pot and going topless; everything was health food and exercise and cool. So we just satirized that whole time. And that’s why that line of Elliott’s — ‘It’s OK with me’ — became his key line throughout the film.” —Robert Altman

ALTMAN DESCRIBES HIS PARTICULAR WAY OF SHOOTING THE LONG GOODBYE:

“I decided that the camera should never stop moving. It was arbitrary. We would just put the camera on a dolly and everything would move or pan, but it didn’t match the action; usually it was counter to it. It gave me that feeling that when the audience see the film, they’re kind of a voyeur. You’re looking at something you shouldn’t be looking at. Not that what you’re seeing is off limits; just that you’re not supposed to be there. You had to see over someone’s shoulder or peer round someone’s back. I just think that in so many films everything’s so beautiful, the lighting is gorgeous and with each shot everything is relit. My method also means you don’t have to light for close-ups; you only have to accommodate what may happen, so you just light the scene and it saves a lot of time. The rougher it looked, the better it served my purpose.

I was worried about the harsh light of southern California and I wanted to give the film the soft, pastel look you see on old postcards from the 1940s. So we post-flashed the film even further than we did on McCabe & Mrs Miller, almost 100 percent.”

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Leigh Brackett’s screenplay for The Long Goodbye [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers. Absolutely our highest recommendation.

Originally broadcast on 17 July 1996 in Channel Four’s Cinefile series, Paul Joyce’s acclaimed documentary profile of Robert Altman, with contributions from Altman, Gould, Shelley Duvall, assistant director Alan Rudolph and screenwriter Joan Tewkesbury, spans his career from its earliest beginnings to Kansas City  (1996) and offer some interesting insight into the director’s career.

Film critic Tony Macklin visited Leigh Brackett “on a hot, humid, blazing July 1975 day” at her farmhouse in Kinsman, Ohio. “I vividly remember Leigh’s making us lemonade to help cool us — it was pure sugar.” See also: Leigh Brackett — Journeyman Plumber. Daniel Martin Eckhart discovered more about what must have been a very special friendship between Brackett and Hawks.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Aug 14

Your rights as a photographer

lunapros:

Tips from the ACLU’s website to help you know your rights while photographing in public.

  • When in public spaces where you are lawfully present you have the right to photograph anything that is in plain view. That includes pictures of federal buildings, transportation…

Source: lunapros

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.

Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.

Stuff I Like

Me on Twitter

loading...

Ask me anything