moshita:

Lyre,

made of human skull, antelope horn, skin, gut, hair, 19th century

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

2,042 notes

midcenturymodernfreak:

Girls & Robots!

Both robots were designed by production designer Robert Kinoshita in 1956 (Robby the Robot) and 1965 (Robot “B9”).

Via: 1 | 2

1,235 notes

destroyed-and-abandoned:

The buried church tower of Plymouth, Montserrat. The city was overwhelmed by volcanic eruptions starting in the 1990s, and is now entirely abandoned after whole neighborhoods were flooded with ash and lava. photo by Brennan Linsley
Read More

destroyed-and-abandoned:

The buried church tower of Plymouth, Montserrat. The city was overwhelmed by volcanic eruptions starting in the 1990s, and is now entirely abandoned after whole neighborhoods were flooded with ash and lava. photo by Brennan Linsley

Read More

348 notes

bigredrobot:

Author. Dreamweaver. Visionary. Plus, actor.

(Source: milokerrigan)

4,780 notes

And here, the biggest lesson of them all, and a summation of all the problems.

You are in the way of your story.

Hard truth: writing is actually not that important.

Writing is a mechanism.

It’s an inelegant middleman to what we do. It’s a shame, in some ways, that we even call ourselves writers, because it describes only the mechanical act of what we do. It’s a vital mechanism, sure, but by describing it as the prominent thing, it tends to suggest, well, prominence.

But our writing must serve story.

Story does not serve writing.

This is cart-before-horse stuff, but important to realize.

Listen, in what we do there exist three essential participants.

We have:

The tale, the teller of the tale, and the listener of the tale.

Story. Author. And audience.

That’s it.

You are two-thirds of that equation. You are the story (or, by proxy, its architect) and the teller of the story. The telling of the story is most often done through writing — through that mechanical act, and because it’s the act you can sit and watch, it’s the one that is used to describe our role. I AM WRITER, you say, and so you focus so much on the actual writing you forget that there’s this other invisible — but altogether more critical — part, which is what you’re writing.

So, what happens is, early on, you put so much on the page. You write and write and write and use too many words and too much exposition and big meaty paragraphs and at the end all it serves to do is create distance between the tale and the listener of the tale.

It keeps the audience at arm’s length.

Quit that shit.

Bring the audience into the story. This is at the heart of show, don’t tell — which is a rule that can and should be broken at times, but at its core remains a reasonable notion: don’t talk at, don’t preach, don’t lecture, don’t fill their time with unnecessary wordsmithy.

Get. To. The. Point.

3,003 notes

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

  Skulls ornately carved by Jason Border

“Through personal subliminal exploration, my work reveals the blurred line between imagination and reality, animal and human, life and death.”

Using a Dremel, Portland-based artist Jason Borders ornately carves each of these skulls by hand. Many of the characters that appear on his work are often repeated, fluctuating in style, motif, meaning and execution. The artists work “reveals the blurred line between imagination and reality, animal and human, life and death.”


2,129 notes

blasted-pumpkins:

Eiko Ishioka, incredible costume designer (1938-2012)

In particular, she designed costumes of Dracula (Coppola), the Cell, Immortals,….

More precisions about her work on wikipedia

11,207 notes

Haruki Murakami Bingo

Haruki Murakami Bingo

71 notes

architectureofdoom:

arqbto:

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church — Egon Eiermann (1961)
Berlin, Germany.

View this on the map

architectureofdoom:

arqbto:

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church — Egon Eiermann (1961)

Berlin, Germany.

View this on the map

774 notes